Mills Record Company

Those of you dear readers who regularly scan the "8 Days a Week" calendar section of this paper have undoubtedly come across Richie Reinholdt's name more than once, and often three or more times in a week. Reinholdt is one of the most ubiquitous performers in the area, playing solo or in Britchy with Britt Arnesen, as well as performing with the Country Kings. Having seen Reinholdt perform on many occasions I can say that he is one of the most laid back and competent players around these parts. If he made a mistake we wouldn't know it unless he owned up to it. And he most likely won't be smashing any guitars or doing his best Pete Townsend windmill impression either. He simply respects the songs he plays and performs them graciously and with alacrity. His new album, Pleasure Madness, is a quiet affair lacking bluster. No bluster is a good thing. This is the kind of album you might put on in your living room while cooking dinner. The kind that quietly catches your hips and has your feet shuffling as you dice tomatoes or shred cheese. The topics are your basic country music tropes: love, lost love and trains. In "Breaking My Heart" Reinholdt sings in his Tom Petty-esque voice, along with musical accomplice Britt Arnesen, "You're out every night and I'm walking the floor/Waiting for you to stumble through the door/Whiskey on your breath when you finally come home/Your lipstick is smeared, dress is tattered and torn." As Dr. Phil would say, you treat people how to treat you, and the narrator of this piece gets what he deserves in my book (Just leave her already!). However, if what Dr. Phil says is a truism, then Reinholdt's latest release teaches us that we should check out an artist with a lifetime of sustained superior performances and that we'll be rewarded with earfuls of tasty licks and timeless tunes. -Jason McMackin Missoula Independent Jan. 10, 2013 January 18, 2013 12:00 am  By Cory Walsh of the Missoulian Music is Richie Reinholdt's full-time job, and has been for decades. Writing songs, however, isn't something he can punch in at 8 and start doing on command. "In some ways, it's like a wound or something. It kind of happens by accident," the veteran Missoula musician said. "You know, it'll just strike me in that way. Sometimes, it'll be one phrase. ... One phrase can sort of explode into a whole sequence." For most projects, including his latest album, "Pleasure Madness," he goes in with only two or three songs and begins writing more as the process unfolds. For those who haven't caught Reinholdt at any of his 104-odd gigs a year, you could probably lump his music into the vague category of Americana. Not that anyone is certain what that is. "Americana is everything that isn't country or pop," Reinholdt said. Apple's designator of genres, iTunes, would probably call his new record "country," as imperfect as that tag is. "I don't really think of it in terms of what modern country is. For example, it doesn't sound like a Taylor Swift record." On the 10 originals, he continues to mine his longtime interests - the image-heavy lyrics of Bob Dylan, Neil Young and the Byrds, and the inescapable influence of the Beatles and the Everly Brothers. Tying it all together are Reinholdt's skillful guitar playing and distinctive singing voice - which has a high register and calm, explanatory manner similar to Tom Petty's. They vary from impressionistic, image-heavy songs like the opener, "Court Jester," to more straightforward, catchy numbers like the closer, "Six Strings," which features classic country-style lyrics such as: "A prisoner of my dreams, "That's the way it seems, "Spending the night with the only friends in sight, "Three chords, six strings and a beer." The songs were recorded with a cast of local musicians at Reinholdt's home studio, which he says is more of a bedroom with high-end equipment. Aside from Reinholdt on lead vocals, guitar, bass, mandolin and banjo, it features Andy Dunnigan (Acousticals and Little Smokies) on dobro; David Horgan (Country Kings, Joan Zen Band) on pedal steel; a small rotation of drummers; and Britt Arnesen on backing vocals. The one out-of-state ringer is Larry Chung on pedal steel. Reinholdt sent the Bay Area resident tracks via email, with spaces left in for his solos. Chung would record his solos and email back his work. Listeners, meanwhile, would have a hard time guessing the musicians were separated by time and thousands of miles during the combined steel and guitar lines on "Court Jester," "Hollywood" and "Hidden Dreams." The latter was co-written with Reinholdt's wife Candace. She had drifted away from writing since college, and he helped mold songs out of her poetry. Modern verse and songwriting have opposing views on rhyming, he said. Tunes require it, but it's out of fashion in poetry. Her contributions did provide a fresh perspective to his music, though. "They were stories, interesting stories from a woman's point of view. It's always nice to have someone else's take on it," he said. Not all of the songs are so heavy on imagery. "Breaking My Heart," is a shuffling song well-suited to a bar with an ample dance floor. "If you're in a crowd, and people are dancing and having a good time, the last thing you want to do is play some kind of emo, depressing song," Reinholdt said. "You wanna go with the mood of what's going on. It's nice to have some of those kind of songs." Reinholdt came to Missoula after the implosion of his Lake Tahoe, Calif.-based band, the Live Wire Choir, which he joined at age 23. "I was lucky, luckier than a lot of - I wouldn't say most - I would say a great deal of players in that I had a pretty good deal of success at a very young age," he said. "I would put (us) in the 'nearly famous' category." The group was big enough in the region to play Aber Day several times and open for the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and Elvin Bishop. Contrary to any images of rock-star glamour, he says it was rainy both years they played, and he spent most of the legendary party in the tour bus. After the Live Wire Choir "essentially imploded" in about 1979, he moved to Missoula. "It was my favorite place in the whole region. I didn't wind up here by accident. I? wound up here on purpose," he said. He played in several well-known acts in the '80s, including the Skanksters. That group was booked as Bo Diddley's backing band for a four-date Montana tour. "You want to talk about charisma, you know? He got out there on stage, and there he is. Bo Diddley. We just sort of disappeared into this background." For about 12 years, he played with the Top Hat's house band for it's regular "Wasted Wednesday" nights, playing covers to college crowds dancing and swilling discount beer. "If you were a certain age in the '90s, it was the place to be on a Wednesday night. That was a lot of fun." It also afforded him the opportunity to play without hitting the road.
Those of you dear readers who regularly scan the "8 Days a Week" calendar section of this paper have undoubtedly come across Richie Reinholdt's name more than once, and often three or more times in a week. Reinholdt is one of the most ubiquitous performers in the area, playing solo or in Britchy with Britt Arnesen, as well as performing with the Country Kings. Having seen Reinholdt perform on many occasions I can say that he is one of the most laid back and competent players around these parts. If he made a mistake we wouldn't know it unless he owned up to it. And he most likely won't be smashing any guitars or doing his best Pete Townsend windmill impression either. He simply respects the songs he plays and performs them graciously and with alacrity. His new album, Pleasure Madness, is a quiet affair lacking bluster. No bluster is a good thing. This is the kind of album you might put on in your living room while cooking dinner. The kind that quietly catches your hips and has your feet shuffling as you dice tomatoes or shred cheese. The topics are your basic country music tropes: love, lost love and trains. In "Breaking My Heart" Reinholdt sings in his Tom Petty-esque voice, along with musical accomplice Britt Arnesen, "You're out every night and I'm walking the floor/Waiting for you to stumble through the door/Whiskey on your breath when you finally come home/Your lipstick is smeared, dress is tattered and torn." As Dr. Phil would say, you treat people how to treat you, and the narrator of this piece gets what he deserves in my book (Just leave her already!). However, if what Dr. Phil says is a truism, then Reinholdt's latest release teaches us that we should check out an artist with a lifetime of sustained superior performances and that we'll be rewarded with earfuls of tasty licks and timeless tunes. -Jason McMackin Missoula Independent Jan. 10, 2013 January 18, 2013 12:00 am  By Cory Walsh of the Missoulian Music is Richie Reinholdt's full-time job, and has been for decades. Writing songs, however, isn't something he can punch in at 8 and start doing on command. "In some ways, it's like a wound or something. It kind of happens by accident," the veteran Missoula musician said. "You know, it'll just strike me in that way. Sometimes, it'll be one phrase. ... One phrase can sort of explode into a whole sequence." For most projects, including his latest album, "Pleasure Madness," he goes in with only two or three songs and begins writing more as the process unfolds. For those who haven't caught Reinholdt at any of his 104-odd gigs a year, you could probably lump his music into the vague category of Americana. Not that anyone is certain what that is. "Americana is everything that isn't country or pop," Reinholdt said. Apple's designator of genres, iTunes, would probably call his new record "country," as imperfect as that tag is. "I don't really think of it in terms of what modern country is. For example, it doesn't sound like a Taylor Swift record." On the 10 originals, he continues to mine his longtime interests - the image-heavy lyrics of Bob Dylan, Neil Young and the Byrds, and the inescapable influence of the Beatles and the Everly Brothers. Tying it all together are Reinholdt's skillful guitar playing and distinctive singing voice - which has a high register and calm, explanatory manner similar to Tom Petty's. They vary from impressionistic, image-heavy songs like the opener, "Court Jester," to more straightforward, catchy numbers like the closer, "Six Strings," which features classic country-style lyrics such as: "A prisoner of my dreams, "That's the way it seems, "Spending the night with the only friends in sight, "Three chords, six strings and a beer." The songs were recorded with a cast of local musicians at Reinholdt's home studio, which he says is more of a bedroom with high-end equipment. Aside from Reinholdt on lead vocals, guitar, bass, mandolin and banjo, it features Andy Dunnigan (Acousticals and Little Smokies) on dobro; David Horgan (Country Kings, Joan Zen Band) on pedal steel; a small rotation of drummers; and Britt Arnesen on backing vocals. The one out-of-state ringer is Larry Chung on pedal steel. Reinholdt sent the Bay Area resident tracks via email, with spaces left in for his solos. Chung would record his solos and email back his work. Listeners, meanwhile, would have a hard time guessing the musicians were separated by time and thousands of miles during the combined steel and guitar lines on "Court Jester," "Hollywood" and "Hidden Dreams." The latter was co-written with Reinholdt's wife Candace. She had drifted away from writing since college, and he helped mold songs out of her poetry. Modern verse and songwriting have opposing views on rhyming, he said. Tunes require it, but it's out of fashion in poetry. Her contributions did provide a fresh perspective to his music, though. "They were stories, interesting stories from a woman's point of view. It's always nice to have someone else's take on it," he said. Not all of the songs are so heavy on imagery. "Breaking My Heart," is a shuffling song well-suited to a bar with an ample dance floor. "If you're in a crowd, and people are dancing and having a good time, the last thing you want to do is play some kind of emo, depressing song," Reinholdt said. "You wanna go with the mood of what's going on. It's nice to have some of those kind of songs." Reinholdt came to Missoula after the implosion of his Lake Tahoe, Calif.-based band, the Live Wire Choir, which he joined at age 23. "I was lucky, luckier than a lot of - I wouldn't say most - I would say a great deal of players in that I had a pretty good deal of success at a very young age," he said. "I would put (us) in the 'nearly famous' category." The group was big enough in the region to play Aber Day several times and open for the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and Elvin Bishop. Contrary to any images of rock-star glamour, he says it was rainy both years they played, and he spent most of the legendary party in the tour bus. After the Live Wire Choir "essentially imploded" in about 1979, he moved to Missoula. "It was my favorite place in the whole region. I didn't wind up here by accident. I? wound up here on purpose," he said. He played in several well-known acts in the '80s, including the Skanksters. That group was booked as Bo Diddley's backing band for a four-date Montana tour. "You want to talk about charisma, you know? He got out there on stage, and there he is. Bo Diddley. We just sort of disappeared into this background." For about 12 years, he played with the Top Hat's house band for it's regular "Wasted Wednesday" nights, playing covers to college crowds dancing and swilling discount beer. "If you were a certain age in the '90s, it was the place to be on a Wednesday night. That was a lot of fun." It also afforded him the opportunity to play without hitting the road.
884501844666

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Format: CD
Label: CDB
Rel. Date: 01/12/2013
UPC: 884501844666

Reinholdt, Richie : Pleasure Madness
Artist: Richie Reinholdt
Format: CD
New: Not in stock
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Those of you dear readers who regularly scan the "8 Days a Week" calendar section of this paper have undoubtedly come across Richie Reinholdt's name more than once, and often three or more times in a week. Reinholdt is one of the most ubiquitous performers in the area, playing solo or in Britchy with Britt Arnesen, as well as performing with the Country Kings. Having seen Reinholdt perform on many occasions I can say that he is one of the most laid back and competent players around these parts. If he made a mistake we wouldn't know it unless he owned up to it. And he most likely won't be smashing any guitars or doing his best Pete Townsend windmill impression either. He simply respects the songs he plays and performs them graciously and with alacrity. His new album, Pleasure Madness, is a quiet affair lacking bluster. No bluster is a good thing. This is the kind of album you might put on in your living room while cooking dinner. The kind that quietly catches your hips and has your feet shuffling as you dice tomatoes or shred cheese. The topics are your basic country music tropes: love, lost love and trains. In "Breaking My Heart" Reinholdt sings in his Tom Petty-esque voice, along with musical accomplice Britt Arnesen, "You're out every night and I'm walking the floor/Waiting for you to stumble through the door/Whiskey on your breath when you finally come home/Your lipstick is smeared, dress is tattered and torn." As Dr. Phil would say, you treat people how to treat you, and the narrator of this piece gets what he deserves in my book (Just leave her already!). However, if what Dr. Phil says is a truism, then Reinholdt's latest release teaches us that we should check out an artist with a lifetime of sustained superior performances and that we'll be rewarded with earfuls of tasty licks and timeless tunes. -Jason McMackin Missoula Independent Jan. 10, 2013 January 18, 2013 12:00 am  By Cory Walsh of the Missoulian Music is Richie Reinholdt's full-time job, and has been for decades. Writing songs, however, isn't something he can punch in at 8 and start doing on command. "In some ways, it's like a wound or something. It kind of happens by accident," the veteran Missoula musician said. "You know, it'll just strike me in that way. Sometimes, it'll be one phrase. ... One phrase can sort of explode into a whole sequence." For most projects, including his latest album, "Pleasure Madness," he goes in with only two or three songs and begins writing more as the process unfolds. For those who haven't caught Reinholdt at any of his 104-odd gigs a year, you could probably lump his music into the vague category of Americana. Not that anyone is certain what that is. "Americana is everything that isn't country or pop," Reinholdt said. Apple's designator of genres, iTunes, would probably call his new record "country," as imperfect as that tag is. "I don't really think of it in terms of what modern country is. For example, it doesn't sound like a Taylor Swift record." On the 10 originals, he continues to mine his longtime interests - the image-heavy lyrics of Bob Dylan, Neil Young and the Byrds, and the inescapable influence of the Beatles and the Everly Brothers. Tying it all together are Reinholdt's skillful guitar playing and distinctive singing voice - which has a high register and calm, explanatory manner similar to Tom Petty's. They vary from impressionistic, image-heavy songs like the opener, "Court Jester," to more straightforward, catchy numbers like the closer, "Six Strings," which features classic country-style lyrics such as: "A prisoner of my dreams, "That's the way it seems, "Spending the night with the only friends in sight, "Three chords, six strings and a beer." The songs were recorded with a cast of local musicians at Reinholdt's home studio, which he says is more of a bedroom with high-end equipment. Aside from Reinholdt on lead vocals, guitar, bass, mandolin and banjo, it features Andy Dunnigan (Acousticals and Little Smokies) on dobro; David Horgan (Country Kings, Joan Zen Band) on pedal steel; a small rotation of drummers; and Britt Arnesen on backing vocals. The one out-of-state ringer is Larry Chung on pedal steel. Reinholdt sent the Bay Area resident tracks via email, with spaces left in for his solos. Chung would record his solos and email back his work. Listeners, meanwhile, would have a hard time guessing the musicians were separated by time and thousands of miles during the combined steel and guitar lines on "Court Jester," "Hollywood" and "Hidden Dreams." The latter was co-written with Reinholdt's wife Candace. She had drifted away from writing since college, and he helped mold songs out of her poetry. Modern verse and songwriting have opposing views on rhyming, he said. Tunes require it, but it's out of fashion in poetry. Her contributions did provide a fresh perspective to his music, though. "They were stories, interesting stories from a woman's point of view. It's always nice to have someone else's take on it," he said. Not all of the songs are so heavy on imagery. "Breaking My Heart," is a shuffling song well-suited to a bar with an ample dance floor. "If you're in a crowd, and people are dancing and having a good time, the last thing you want to do is play some kind of emo, depressing song," Reinholdt said. "You wanna go with the mood of what's going on. It's nice to have some of those kind of songs." Reinholdt came to Missoula after the implosion of his Lake Tahoe, Calif.-based band, the Live Wire Choir, which he joined at age 23. "I was lucky, luckier than a lot of - I wouldn't say most - I would say a great deal of players in that I had a pretty good deal of success at a very young age," he said. "I would put (us) in the 'nearly famous' category." The group was big enough in the region to play Aber Day several times and open for the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band and Elvin Bishop. Contrary to any images of rock-star glamour, he says it was rainy both years they played, and he spent most of the legendary party in the tour bus. After the Live Wire Choir "essentially imploded" in about 1979, he moved to Missoula. "It was my favorite place in the whole region. I didn't wind up here by accident. I? wound up here on purpose," he said. He played in several well-known acts in the '80s, including the Skanksters. That group was booked as Bo Diddley's backing band for a four-date Montana tour. "You want to talk about charisma, you know? He got out there on stage, and there he is. Bo Diddley. We just sort of disappeared into this background." For about 12 years, he played with the Top Hat's house band for it's regular "Wasted Wednesday" nights, playing covers to college crowds dancing and swilling discount beer. "If you were a certain age in the '90s, it was the place to be on a Wednesday night. That was a lot of fun." It also afforded him the opportunity to play without hitting the road.
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