Mills Record Company

With their kinetic R&B rhythms, dub-wise organ lines, and searing social commentary, the Specials were the archetypal band of ska's "2-Tone" revival, which blasted onto the charts in riot-torn Britain at the turn of the '80s. Themes of urban decay and social unrest still abound on More Specials -- on the eerie "Man at C&A" and "Do Nothing" -- but stylistically, the band was branching out from the heady punk rock-dub reggae fusion they perfected on their eponymous debut. The guys have a little fun on the half-sardonic "Enjoy Yourself" with some Go-Go's on harmonies, the bouncy barroom duet "Pearl's Café" on which Terry Hall trades verses with Bodysnatchers singer Rhoda Dakar, and the horn-pumped Bond ode "Sock It to 'em J.B." But the Specials signal a new direction with the scathing, two-part "Stereotypes," a bash at contemporary British culture that makes good on the promise of experimental dub production techniques. Elsewhere, keyboardist and unofficial bandleader Jerry Dammers dabbles in the kitschy sounds of the lounge jazz era on the unsettling "International Jet Set" and "I Can't Stand It," another Hall-Dakar duet. Strangely, two of the best tracks are relegated to the enhanced part of the disc, appearing as videos: "Rat Race," which was released prior to the album in the U.K. but originally included on the U.S. version, and "Ghost Town," the band's timely swan song, which topped the British charts just as race riots were exploding and remains the jewel in their rude-boy crown.
With their kinetic R&B rhythms, dub-wise organ lines, and searing social commentary, the Specials were the archetypal band of ska's "2-Tone" revival, which blasted onto the charts in riot-torn Britain at the turn of the '80s. Themes of urban decay and social unrest still abound on More Specials -- on the eerie "Man at C&A" and "Do Nothing" -- but stylistically, the band was branching out from the heady punk rock-dub reggae fusion they perfected on their eponymous debut. The guys have a little fun on the half-sardonic "Enjoy Yourself" with some Go-Go's on harmonies, the bouncy barroom duet "Pearl's Café" on which Terry Hall trades verses with Bodysnatchers singer Rhoda Dakar, and the horn-pumped Bond ode "Sock It to 'em J.B." But the Specials signal a new direction with the scathing, two-part "Stereotypes," a bash at contemporary British culture that makes good on the promise of experimental dub production techniques. Elsewhere, keyboardist and unofficial bandleader Jerry Dammers dabbles in the kitschy sounds of the lounge jazz era on the unsettling "International Jet Set" and "I Can't Stand It," another Hall-Dakar duet. Strangely, two of the best tracks are relegated to the enhanced part of the disc, appearing as videos: "Rat Race," which was released prior to the album in the U.K. but originally included on the U.S. version, and "Ghost Town," the band's timely swan song, which topped the British charts just as race riots were exploding and remains the jewel in their rude-boy crown.
724353769901

Details

Format: CD
Label: Emm/Emm
Catalog: 37699
Rel. Date: 05/21/2002
UPC: 724353769901

More Specials [2002 Remaster]
Artist: The Specials
Format: CD
New: Not in stock
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With their kinetic R&B rhythms, dub-wise organ lines, and searing social commentary, the Specials were the archetypal band of ska's "2-Tone" revival, which blasted onto the charts in riot-torn Britain at the turn of the '80s. Themes of urban decay and social unrest still abound on More Specials -- on the eerie "Man at C&A" and "Do Nothing" -- but stylistically, the band was branching out from the heady punk rock-dub reggae fusion they perfected on their eponymous debut. The guys have a little fun on the half-sardonic "Enjoy Yourself" with some Go-Go's on harmonies, the bouncy barroom duet "Pearl's Café" on which Terry Hall trades verses with Bodysnatchers singer Rhoda Dakar, and the horn-pumped Bond ode "Sock It to 'em J.B." But the Specials signal a new direction with the scathing, two-part "Stereotypes," a bash at contemporary British culture that makes good on the promise of experimental dub production techniques. Elsewhere, keyboardist and unofficial bandleader Jerry Dammers dabbles in the kitschy sounds of the lounge jazz era on the unsettling "International Jet Set" and "I Can't Stand It," another Hall-Dakar duet. Strangely, two of the best tracks are relegated to the enhanced part of the disc, appearing as videos: "Rat Race," which was released prior to the album in the U.K. but originally included on the U.S. version, and "Ghost Town," the band's timely swan song, which topped the British charts just as race riots were exploding and remains the jewel in their rude-boy crown.
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